Back To Roots health

            Affordable Natural health care solutions for the whole family you can trust. 

                      Babys first food lists

                      Baby's first foods

From 6 months old your baby can try a range of foods. Your baby will cope best with one new food at a time and small amounts to start with. If you buy baby food, check the labels for the age and stage they suit. As your baby gets older, you can start introducing more variety into their diet. Eventually, your baby will be able to eat the same foods as you.

Carrots are rich in beta-carotene, the plant form of vitamin A, and make excellent weaning food, as babies like their naturally sweet taste. Darker, older carrots contain more beta-carotene than baby, new carrots.

Root vegetables make the perfect weaning food because of their naturally sweet taste and smooth texture when pureed. Try carrots, potatoes, sweet potatoes, butternut squash, rutabaga, and parsnip.

Butternut squash is easily digested and rarely causes allergies; therefore it makes perfect weaning food. It provides an excellent source of beta-carotene.

Parsnips provide a good source of starch and fiber. They also contain the antioxidant vitamins C and E.

Sweet potato comes in two varieties: orange-fleshed and creamy-fleshed. Both have red skins and both are good sources of potassium, vitamin C, and fiber. However, I prefer to use the orange-fleshed variety, which is also an excellent source of beta-carotene. This helps to prevent certain types of cancer and mops up free radicals.

Zucchini is a good source of beta-carotene, but most of the nutrients lie in the skin, so do not peel it.

Broccoli is a true Superfood, as it is a great source of vitamin C and also contains beta-carotene, folic acid, iron, potassium, and anticancer phytonutrients. Broccoli is best steamed or microwaved, as boiling it in water halves its vitamin C content. If your baby isn't keen on the taste, mix it with a sweet-tasting vegetable like sweet potato, rutabaga, or butternut squash.

Potatoes contain vitamin C and are a good source of potassium. They also blend well with most vegetables.

First Foods: Fruits

Apple puree is very easy to digest, so it makes great baby food. The BRAT diet (that is, banana, rice, apples, and toast) is popular with doctors for the relief of diarrhea. Pectin, the soluble fiber in apples, also helps fight against constipation.

Papaya flesh is easy to swallow, so it makes ideal weaning food. It is rich in vitamin C and beta-carotene, and 3 ounces of papaya will provide a young child's daily requirement of vitamin C. Papaya is also high in soluble fiber, which is important for normal bowel function. Papaya also contains enzymes that aid digestion.

Pears are one of the least allergenic foods, so they make great weaning food.

Bananas are full of slow-release sugars, which provide sustained energy. They make perfect portable baby food, as they come in their own easy-to-peel packaging. They are also good for the treatment of diarrhea and constipation.

Apricots are a good source of beta-carotene and also contain fiber. They're also a good source of iron and potassium.

Cantaloupe is the most nutritious variety of melon. It is very sweet and rich in vitamin C and beta-carotene.

Blueberries are rich in vitamin C and also contain beta-carotene. The blue pigment anthocyanin in the skin of the blueberries helps protect us against cancer. Blueberries have the highest antioxidant capacity of all fruits.

Peaches provide a good source of vitamin C, and the soft flesh is easy to digest.

Rice and Meat

Baby rice should be the first cereal you introduce because it does not contain gluten, a protein found in wheat, oats, barley, and rye that can cause food allergy if introduced before 6 months. Baby rice is easily digested and has a milky taste that helps to ease your baby's transition from a purely milk-based diet to solids. It is a good thickener for runny purees like pear, peach, and plum.

Red meat provides the best source of iron for your baby. It is important to introduce iron-rich foods, as a baby's iron reserves inherited from his mother start to run out at 6 months. Breast milk does not contain adequate amounts of iron.


6 months
First Veggies

Carrots are rich in beta-carotene, the plant form of vitamin A, and make excellent weaning food, as babies like their naturally sweet taste. Darker, older carrots contain more beta-carotene than baby, new carrots.

Root vegetables make the perfect weaning food because of their naturally sweet taste and smooth texture when pureed. Try carrots, potatoes, sweet potatoes, butternut squash, rutabaga, and parsnip.

Butternut squash is easily digested and rarely causes allergies; therefore it makes perfect weaning food. It provides an excellent source of beta-carotene.

Parsnips provide a good source of starch and fiber. They also contain the antioxidant vitamins C and E.

Sweet potato comes in two varieties: orange-fleshed and creamy-fleshed. Both have red skins and both are good sources of potassium, vitamin C, and fiber. However, I prefer to use the orange-fleshed variety, which is also an excellent source of beta-carotene. This helps to prevent certain types of cancer and mops up free radicals.

Zucchini is a good source of beta-carotene, but most of the nutrients lie in the skin, so do not peel it.

Broccoli is a true Superfood, as it is a great source of vitamin C and also contains beta-carotene, folic acid, iron, potassium, and anticancer phytonutrients. Broccoli is best steamed or microwaved, as boiling it in water halves its vitamin C content. If your baby isn't keen on the taste, mix it with a sweet-tasting vegetable like sweet potato, rutabaga, or butternut squash.

Potatoes contain vitamin C and are a good source of potassium. They also blend well with most vegetables.


First Foods: Fruits

Apple puree is very easy to digest, so it makes great baby food. The BRAT diet (that is, banana, rice, apples, and toast) is popular with doctors for the relief of diarrhea. Pectin, the soluble fiber in apples, also helps fight against constipation.

Papaya flesh is easy to swallow, so it makes ideal weaning food. It is rich in vitamin C and beta-carotene, and 3 ounces of papaya will provide a young child's daily requirement of vitamin C. Papaya is also high in soluble fiber, which is important for normal bowel function. Papaya also contains enzymes that aid digestion.

Pears are one of the least allergenic foods, so they make great weaning food.

Bananas are full of slow-release sugars, which provide sustained energy. They make perfect portable baby food, as they come in their own easy-to-peel packaging. They are also good for the treatment of diarrhea and constipation.

Apricots are a good source of beta-carotene and also contain fiber. They're also a good source of iron and potassium.

Cantaloupe is the most nutritious variety of melon. It is very sweet and rich in vitamin C and beta-carotene.

Blueberries are rich in vitamin C and also contain beta-carotene. The blue pigment anthocyanin in the skin of the blueberries helps protect us against cancer. Blueberries have the highest antioxidant capacity of all fruits.

Peaches provide a good source of vitamin C, and the soft flesh is easy to digest.


Rice and Meat

Baby rice should be the first cereal you introduce because it does not contain gluten, a protein found in wheat, oats, barley, and rye that can cause food allergy if introduced before 6 months. Baby rice is easily digested and has a milky taste that helps to ease your baby's transition from a purely milk-based diet to solids. It is a good thickener for runny purees like pear, peach, and plum.

Red meat provides the best source of iron for your baby. It is important to introduce iron-rich foods, as a baby's iron reserves inherited from his mother start to run out at 6 months. Breast milk does not contain adequate amounts of iron.

Recipe: Creamy Vegetable Puree

Stronger-tasting vegetables such as parsnip, carrot, and broccoli can be given a more creamy mild taste by combining them with some baby rice and milk.

Ingredients:
1 tablespoon baby rice cereal
3 tablespoons your baby's usual milk
1/4 cup vegetable puree

Directions: Mix the baby rice and milk together according to the package instructions and stir into the vegetable puree until thoroughly combined.


7-8 months

Your baby can eat a good and different variety of first foods, which you can see below. You can also offer them foods with more texture to help them learn how to chew. Process the food for a shorter time or mash soft foods with a fork or masher.

Offer your baby 2–3 meals a day.


8–12 months

Start to offer your baby solids before your baby’s breast milk or formula feed. Giving your baby their breastfeeds or formula is still important for their growth, but you may notice they want fewer feeds.

By this stage, your baby will probably be having 3–4 meals a day, with 1–2 snacks. Your baby may now enjoy a large variety of types of foods, flavours, and textures.

Your baby won’t be ready for cows’ milk and soya milk until they are 1 year old.

Your baby will enjoy mashed or finely chopped foods as they learn to chew. Foods to try include:


1 year

By 1 year, your baby will probably be eating many of the same foods as the rest of the family/whānau.

Hold off on high-fibre foods, such as heavy wholemeal bread, wholegrain bread and bran. These foods can fill your baby up too much, leaving less room for other nutritious foods.

During their second year, your toddler will learn how to chew and swallow wholegrain bread without choking on it.